July 2018

Finds of the month

It was standing room only at our July meeting, as membership continues to grow and we have a very active programme on club nights. Graeme Simmonds gave a very interesting talk on Lead Cloth Seals, and Godfrey Pratt presented details of the upcoming dig season starting at the end of July. So far there are seven club charity digs lined up, all on new fields and some on new estates out of the county for the first time. The finds table had the best selection we’ve seen for a long time, and the Find Of The Month winners were: Best Artefact – Mick Pickering with a small, late Bronze Age socketed chisel with flared blade. Described as a Transitional Stage type, it dates from the late Bronze Age c. 800 B.C. to early Iron Age c. 500 B.C. Best Coin – James Simmons with an early Anglo Saxon sceatta. Primary phase c. 680 – 710 A.D. Known as a ‘Standard Type’ as it is modelled on late Roman coinage bearing military standards on the reverse. Other coins of note were a fine Charles I sixpence, and a Roman bronze quenarius of Allectus from 293 – 296AD. Every month Graeme will select two metal detecting finds from all those that are submitted to be put forward to the PAS. A winner will be selected for Best Coin and Best Artefact. To qualify for the competition, the find must have been found by you (not off eBay!) in the last two months, and qualify to be listed on the PAS (including Treasure). Certificates will be awarded to the winners, and their find will automatically be entered for the club’s Find Of The Year Award, which will be announced at the next AGM.

 

Here are the finds of the month for July:

James Simmons receiving his ‘coin of the month’ certificate for his early Anglo Saxon sceatta “I found this coin at a site south of Norwich using XP Deus with 9” high frequency coil using the ultimate program 54 kHz. Found on arable land 1-2”deep.”

Artefact Of The Month Winner: Mick Pickering for a small, late Bronze Age socketed chisel with flared blade. Described as a Transitional Stage type, it dates from the late Bronze Age c. 800 B.C. to early Iron Age c. 500 B.C.

 

 

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